Units

Packs          Troops         Crews           Ships

Please notify the webmaster of any corrections or changes in leadership.

W.L. Davis District Packs

Cub Scouting is for boys in the first through fifth grades, or 7 to 10 years of age. Since its beginning, the Cub Scout program has been a fun and educational experience concerned with values. Besides providing a positive place where boys can enjoy safe, wholesome activities, Cub Scouting focuses on building character, improving physical fitness, teaching practical skills, and developing a spirit of community service.

Pack

Location of Meetings

Day Time

Unit Leader 
(right click name to email)

Phone

Commissioner*

 
Pack 1 Redeemer Evangelical Church   7:00 pm Maggie Belmont 832.443.8433    
Pack 7  Immaculate Heart of Mary Mondays  6:00 pm Domingo Carranza 713-725-9561   
Pack 118  Immaculate Conception       Marisol Galvan 713.876.0945     
Pack 185  Greater Rosehill Baptist Church       Joe Alexander 832-499-5792      
Pack 242  Wheeler Avenue Saturdays 10:00 am Jeffery Misher 713-837-6465      
Pack 426  Windsor Village Saturdays 10:00 am Felicia Reed 832-248-0440      
Pack 434  Blueridge United Methodist Saturdays 10:00 am Barbara J. Rayford 713-734-1977      
Pack 522  Crespo Elementary      Blanca Luna 713.384.0388      
Pack 586  Burnet Elementary      Andrew Rodriguez 713.560.1977      
Pack 686  Lilly Grove   Saturday, 2nd & 4th 1:00 pm Luther Mayberry 281-438-6710      
Pack 702  DeZavala Elementary Wednesdays    Valerie Ruiz 713.498.9371  Domingo Carranza  
Pack 916  Resurrection Church       Erica Gillette       
Pack 1442  Cross Roads Saturdays 10:00 am Johnny Frank Arline 713-412-0308      
Pack 1500  Brentwood Baptist Saturdays   10:00 am Devin Gordon  281-795-8057  Carolyn Hughes  
Pack 3601        William Kempt       

    
W.L. Davis District Troops

Boy Scouting is available to boys who have earned the Cub Scout Arrow of Light Award and are at least 10 years old, or have completed the fifth grade and are at least 10, or who are 11, but not yet 18 years old. The program achieves the BSA's objectives of developing character, citizenship, and personal fitness.

Troop

Location of Meetings

Day

Time

Unit Leader  (click name to email)

Phone

Commissioner*

 
Troop 4  Redeemer Evangelical Church Mondays 7:00 pm Edward .L Cedillo 832-428-6999    
Troop 7 Immaculate Heart of Mary Mondays 7:00 pm Domingo Carranza 713-725-9561 James Fulton
Troop 118 Immaculate Conception     James Fulton 832-857-1008    
Troop 169 New Beginings     Joseph Jefferson 832-283-1220    
Troop 185 Greater Rosehill Baptist Church     Joe Alexander 832-499-5792    
Troop 212 St. James Espiscopal Saturdays 9:00 am Lionel Jellins 713-748-8767    
Troop 216 Gloryland Church     Gary Mann 832-865-1986    
Troop 242 Wheeler Avenue Tuesday 7:00 pm Torrance Earle 832-338-7205    
Troop 333 Mt. Corinth     Damon Mitchell 281-686-5321    
Troop 426 Windsor Village Thursdays (2nd & 4th)   Theo Moody 713-409-5554    
Troop 434 Blueridge United Methodist Saturdays 10:00 am Lionel Tomlin 713-729-6291    
Troop 500 Brentwood Baptist Saturdays 10:00 am Geoffrey Crawford 281-980-9490 Carolyn Hughes  
Troop 601 New Faith     Louis McKinney 281-684-7459    
Troop 613 St. John's United     Charles Taylor 281-687-8306    
Troop 686 Lilly Grove Satrudays, 2nd & 4th 1:00 pm Michael McCleary 281-935-1915    
Troop 1848 Trinity United Christian Saturdays 10:00 am Harold Mitchell, Jr. 832-866-8310    

    
W.L. Davis District Venturing Crews

Venturing is a youth development program of the Boy Scouts of America for young men and women who are 13 and have completed the eighth grade, or age 14 through 20 years of age. Venturing's purpose is to provide positive experiences to help young people mature and to prepare them to become responsible and caring adults.

Venturing is based on a unique and dynamic relationship between youth, adult leaders, and organizations in their communities. Local community organizations establish a Venturing crew by matching their people and program resources to the interests of young people in the community. The result is a program of exciting and meaningful activities that helps youth pursue their special interests, grow, develop leadership skills, and become good citizens. Venturing crews can specialize in a variety of avocation or hobby interests.

Crew

Location of Meetings

Day Time

Unit Leader  (click name to email)

Phone

Commissioner*

Crew 17 Young Women's College Preparatory Academy     Astra Zeno 713-581-4936  
Crew 118 Immaculate Conception     James Fulton 832-857-1008  
Crew 523 Mt. Carmel     Rene Sanchez 713-306-3523  

       

W.L. Davis District Ships

Sea Scouts are run by the youth members. Elected officers plan and conduct the program. Being part of the vessel’s crew teaches teamwork. As experience is gained, more opportunities arise to contribute to the leadership of the unit. At quarterdeck meetings, ship’s officers work together to plan and evaluate the ship’s program. Leadership skills learned in Sea Scouts last a lifetime. Sea Scouts give service to others and have been of service to hundreds of communities across the nation. Service can be expressed in individual good turns to others, or in organized projects involving the crew or the whole ship. In rescues at sea, or facing emergencies on shore, Sea Scouts have saved lives and property. Sea Scout service puts citizenship into action. Sea Scout advancement rewards individual pursuits of excellence. Each level of advancement marks growth as a seaman and a leader. The highest rank a Sea Scout can earn is the prestigious Quartermaster rank. Seafaring has traditions that go back hundreds of years. Sea Scouts have adapted these traditions to the Sea Scout program and have created traditions of their own. A youth must be 13 years of age and graduated from the eighth grade, or be 14, to join Sea Scouts. A youth can stay in Sea Scouts until 21 years of age. Sea Scout ships can be located by contacting the Boy Scouts of America in your area. If there is not a ship nearby, encourage parents, school, church, or community organizations to organize one.

Ship

Location of Meetings

Unit Leader (click name to email)

Phone

Commissioner*

Ship 17 Austin High School Kaleb Baun 832.567.2423  

    
Commissioners*

Commissioners are district and council volunteers who help units succeed. They are available to coach and consult with parents and leaders of Cub Scout packs, Boy Scout troops and Venturing crews and ships. Please feel free to contact your commissioner anytime with questions. Commissioners help maintain the standards of the Boy Scouts of America. They also oversee the unit recharter plan, so that each unit re-registers on time with an optimal number of youth and adult members.

A commissioner plays several roles, including friend, representative, unit "doctor," teacher, and counselor. Of all their roles, friend is the most important. It springs from the attitude, "I care; I am here to help, what can I do for you?" Caring is the ingredient that makes commissioner service successful. He or she is an advocate of unit needs. A commissioner who makes himself known and accepted now will be called on in future times of trouble.

  • The commissioner is a representative. The average unit leader is totally occupied in working with kids. Some have little if any contact with the Boy Scouts of America, other than a commissioner's visit to their meeting. To them, the commissioner may be the BSA. The commissioner helps represent the ideals, the principles, and the policies of the Scouting movement.
  • The commissioner is a unit "doctor." In their role as "doctor," they know that prevention is better than a cure, so they try to see that their units make good "health practices" a way of life. When problems arise, and they will, even in the best unit, they act quickly. They observe symptoms, diagnose the real ailment, prescribe a remedy, and follow up on the patient.
  • The commissioner is a teacher. As a commissioner, they will have a wonderful opportunity to participate in the growth of unit leaders by sharing knowledge with them. They teach not just in an academic environment, but where it counts most—as an immediate response to a need to know. That is the best adult learning situation, since the lesson is instantly reinforced by practical application of the new knowledge.
  • The commissioner is a counselor. As a Scouting counselor, they will help units solve their own problems. Counseling is the best role when unit leaders don't recognize a problem and where solutions are not clear-cut. Everyone needs counseling from time to time, even experienced leaders.